By Andy Fraher & John Wilkerson “We’d like to invite our business class cabin to board now. We’ll begin our general boarding process in just a few minutes; please wait for your zone number to be called before approaching the boarding gate.” Does this announcement leave you feeling anxious and stressed out? How about angry that, in our society, class distinctions still exist? Are you preparing to throw elbows with the rest of the masses to ensure that you can get to your cramped seat and have space to store your carry-on in the overhead bin? Your reaction likely depends on a number of things, including your comfort level with large groups, your ability to pack items efficiently, and your level of zen in trusting that the airline will deliver you and your belongings to the appropriate place in a reasonable amount of time. As you travel more often, you may even become one of the lucky few who get to board early due to your mileage-based upgrade to business class! Learning the “ins-n-outs” of travel planning, packing, mileage plans, hotel rewards, and surviving while on the road adds a level of complexity to an international educator’s career that some find exhilarating, while others feel burdened by these things. What are the top 5 tips that experienced “road warriors” have for others in the field? Below are some of our tips for you: 1. Pick an airline mileage plan , and whenever possible, stick to this airline or alliance group if possible. This may mean that you take a layover when a direct flight is available, but the benefits of “Status” with an airline will usually outweigh the temporary negative of a few extra hours of travel. Free checked luggage, priority “Comfort Class” seating and upgrades, and possible access to airport lounges can all make the extra time well worth the inconvenience of an extra flight. 2. Packing cubes . You may have heard the packing tip to set aside what you think you need for a trip, and then remove half of it before packing. This may work. I would suggest purchasing packing cubes. These light and flexible tools allow you to keep your clothing efficiently packed and easily found in your luggage. And, for some reason, I can now pack what used to go in a full-sized checked bag into one carry on for my trips. Packing cubes may be the single greatest travel invention I’ve ever seen! 3. Utilize hotel rewards plans much like airline rewards plans—try to stick with one major plan—but don’t get as attached to these as the airline plan you utilize. The reason for this is that some cities won’t have reasonably priced options in every hotel reward plan to make it worth your while to stick with one plan. You need to be a bit flexible on this, but the room upgrades, Internet access, and executive floor lounge access can save on your travel costs as well. 4. Take a water filter with you on international travel . There are many good products out there—find one that works and is portable for you. Having access to safe drinking water is critical to maintaining your health while traveling—and some hotels don’t provide you with free water bottles in your rooms. A backpacking filter or a bottle with a built in virustat filter can make your travel much more comfortable. 5. Take it all in! Enjoy being out in the world and seeing new things. When you have free time, use it to see new places, try new foods, and learn about our world. Travel is the greatest benefit of many of our jobs. We are very fortunate to be in this field! Andy Fraher has worked in international education with Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, AZ for 16 years. He has served as an international student advisor, coordinated study abroad efforts, and currently manages international student admissions for the campus. He has also served in various local, regional, and national positions within NAFSA throughout his career. John Wilkerson serves as Director of the Office of International Admissions at the University of Missouri. He is in his ninth year in the field of international education, having previously served as Director of Study Abroad for the University of Missouri School of Journalism, and as Director of Admissions at Columbia College. He holds leadership positions within NAFSA and the Council of International Schools.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

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Isle Sur La Sorgue Market Thanks to our wonderful program directors, we’ve been fortunate enough to visit lots of little French towns in the Provence region, all of which I’ve fallen in love with. Yesterday we visited three different villages in southeastern France, one of which was tucked up against the side of a mountain, built around a spring in a valley at the foot of the Vaucluse Mountains. Called Fontaine-de-Vaucluse (“spring of Vaucluse”), it is named after the spring, the source of the River Sorgue. I felt like I had stepped into  Beauty and the Beast,  for the colorful houses and shops perfectly complimented the natural landscape, with the water and mountains a stunning backdrop.  All of the towns had something in common: quaint, picturesque, and supremely peaceful. I could’ve walked around the market at Isle Sur La Sorgue for hours and hours and hours. There were spices, and perfumes, and leather bags and jackets, and all kinds of meats, and glittering jewelry. I had way too much fun picking out gifts for my many sisters back home. It really felt like something out of fairytale–the little old man who jollily stood behind his table of hand-made wooden kitchenware smiled as I admired his work and delicate creations. I think it was the combination of his smiling eyes and his undeniably lovely wood-work that got me…I walked away with more bowls and spoons than I could possibly fit in my suitcase. But worth it it was! Fontaine-de-Vaucluse Lolo at work CEA feast at Lolo’s Aside from these lovely little trips to Provençal towns, there was another excursion that I’ll never forget. Last weekend we all visited (all 30+ of us) an 89 year-old man named Lolo, who lives on a farm about an hour outside of Aix, in the Provence countryside. He alone prepared a five course meal that we enjoyed by a great, big fire, all the while sipping rosé and red wine form a nearby vineyard. Each course was brought out separately, and eaten slowly and leisurely– after all, the many hours that Lolo put into preparing the whole meal ought to have been fully appreciated (Mom, I think you’d be a fan of this…the work of the chef certainly doesn’t go unnoticed)! By the time we each lined up to give Lolo  bisous,  a kiss on each cheek, and waved “ Au revoir,”  it had been at least a four hour visit… a ritual indeed! Chez Lolo CEA students in Lolo’s olive tree field

[via CEA Study Abroad Programs]

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For everyone who, unlike most study-abroaders, isn’t welcomed home each evening with a fresh, home-cooked, authentic meal prepared by a lovely little “host mom,” this one’s for you. Hopefully I can pass along some helpful tips about healthy (and cheap!) apartment cooking and living while studying abroad. Fear not, it is possible to create meals that rival those of your home-stay friends–it just might take a bit of experimenting and a whole lot of creativity… I do believe that for the first few weeks of living in my apartment here in France, I made a salad with an odd assortment of veggies every single night (yes, every. single. night.). And sure, while that’s certainly healthy, it is by no means enough to sustain a healthy lifestyle–it also just gets really old, really fast. I was clearly a little lost, and entirely unsure of how to go about feeding myself properly in a foreign country. First step? Find a good grocery store! Maybe your definition of “good” is different from someone else’s. Mine, however, means reasonably cheap, fresh, easy to navigate, and of course, good quality. Once I discovered said grocery store in Aix, it was much easier to start thinking about daily and weekly meals. Second, make grocery lists, and stick to them! Once you start living on your own long enough, you know which food items are your basic staples (olive oil, eggs, cheese, milk, butter, spices galore, etc.). And once you knock those of the list, you can start thinking about fairly basic meals that don’t take too long to prepare, but are well-balanced and of course, yummy. Here in France, a popular side-dish is couscous, and it couldn’t be easier to prepare, not to mention almost anything goes with it…lots of room for creativity! From my favorite Boulangerie If you’re like me, a fresh cup of coffee in the morning is an absolute necessity. Fortunately our apartment came with an easy-to-use coffee maker, so indulging my addiction is both trouble-free and cheap. For lunch, I typically just pack a sandwich and bring it with me in the morning since I’m in class all day. Again, buying sandwich supplies at the grocery store is affordable and quite delicious when the cheese aisle is miles long. For bread, I simply must pick up a fresh loaf at the nearby boulangerie (I can’t even begin to express how much I’m going to miss this place). And voila! I don’t think I’ll ever get sick of these fresh sandwiches. Quiche, baked zucchini, broccoli and beans, baguette Like I said, when preparing dinners, it doesn’t have to get too complicated to be well-balanced and yummy. Countless times I’ve made quiche with a side of broccoli and a few slices of a baguette, and it has served as a great go-to meal. Since I have a 99.9% Italian roommate, pasta is also another go-to. Without a doubt, she can whip up at least 50 different variations of pasta, depending on what’s sitting in our pantry at the time. It’s quite impressive! I’ve certainly learned a lot since living with her. But overall, just think of a few relatively simple meals that you can rotate during the week, and then maybe get a little crazier on the weekends when you have more time. And whatever you do, eat more than lettuce and veggies every night. Best of luck, fellow apartment friends, and be confident in your culinary skills! Claire Barrett enjoying a little Baked Ziti 

[via CEA Study Abroad Programs]

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International Summer Sessions at University of California, Davis now offers courses and workshops designed to help international students prepare for graduate study in the United States. Visiting students can sharpen their language skills by enrolling in summer classes in their major or Summer English Language Studies courses in Academic Reading and Writing, Academic Preparation and American Culture. In addition, enrolled students will have the opportunity to attend a free workshop series on the graduate school application process. Topics include “Applying to Graduate School,” “Tips for Writing a Statement of Purpose” and “The UC Davis Graduate School Application.” Students must enroll in a minimum of six units in one or both sessions and can choose from courses in more than 75 departments. To be eligible, students must have graduated from high school and must have an English proficiency score of 80 iBT (or equivalent). • Summer Session 1: June 20 to August 1 (Application Deadline: May 9) • Summer Session 2: August 1 to September 12 (Application Deadline: June 20) To learn more, visit us online at http://intlsummer.ucdavis.edu. Interested students and advisors are invited to sign-up for our monthly newsletter.

[via EducationUSA News Feed]

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Lipstick and a Lover

by Paul Joseph on April 15, 2014 · 0 comments

There’s often an image that comes to mind when we think of the typical French woman: chic, elegant, effortlessly stylish. She always has a handbag casually resting on her wrist, high heels and skinny jeans paired with a leather jacket, and a bold lipstick. I’ve heard it said that all you really need to be a French woman are “two lipsticks and a lover.” So, is it true? What is really the secret to adopting the French’s flawless sense of fashion and chicness? I’m sorry to say, gentlemen, but I’m afraid my thoughts, observations, and advice on this topic may be mostly geared towards the ladies. Of the advice I can offer, though, the most important is this: shoes matter, and French men know how to sport the most stylish, that’s for sure. They typically smell pretty good, too (the men, not their shoes). So go out and get yourself some not-too-overpowering but still noticeable cologne and a pair of sleek leather loafers, and you’ll be golden. Rather than stick out like a sore thumb like some of my American male counterparts who not-so-subtley wear their Nike’s with bluejeans, you’ll surely blend in just fine. As for the ladies, I’ve noticed a few fashion staples in France (and Europe as a whole) that seem fairly easy to incorporate into the wardrobe. First,  jackets are key. Jean, leather, suede, form-fitted, short or long, light or heavy. Whatever the style, they are a necessity, and always paired with a big, fluffy scarf. Like the men, the women certainly know how to top off a look with the perfect pair of shoes. I’ve never seen so many women effortlessly–and seemingly painlessly, I might add–strut in high heels at quite such a rapid pace, and  down a cobble-stone street. Every occasion is an occasion to wear heels here, no matter what. I must say, I rather like the unspoken expectation to look pulled together at all times, even though I often wake up in the morning wanting nothing more than to go to class in my sweats and oversized hoodie. I think the French level of fashion has beaten out some of my laziness, so aside from sometimes resenting it, I am indeed quite grateful. Along with the jacket, scarf, skinny jeans and heels ensemble, the French ladies somehow always have perfect hair. But it’s not perfect in the sense that it looks like a fake sculpture on top of someone’s head that has been practically glued on– it’s perfectly just a bit messy, and simply adds to the effortless effect. I’m not quite sure how they do it, but if they let me in on their secret one of these days, you’ll be the first to know. All in all, I think I’ve come to the conclusion that the French style doesn’t come from the amount of clothes they own, or the quantity of shoes in their closets. More than anything, it’s their general air and confidence that is the most noticeable, and their biggest source of beauty. And while some might see this “air” merely as arrogance, I’d beg to differ–arrogance, no, but elegance, most definitely.

[via CEA Study Abroad Programs]

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Engage with i-Engage!

by Paul Joseph on April 14, 2014 · 0 comments

By Bradley Moon Greetings, international educators, from sunny San Diego! The NAFSA 2014 Annual Conference is less than two months away! If you have not already registered, don’t forget that early-bird registration for the conference ends April 18. This year’s conference includes a very special session designed to provide conference goers with  unique insights into the cross-border and cross-cultural issues and initiatives facing San Diego and Southern California. Inspired by the spirit of the innovative educational format of TED Talks , this session, I-Engage Talks , will be offered on Wednesday, May 28, from 9:00 a.m. to 10:45 a.m. Organized by Local Arrangements Team (LAT) Co-Chairs Jane Kalionzes, San Diego State University, and Susan Atkins, CAPA International, and LAT member Malou Amparo, University of California-San Diego, this locally focused session will provide a series of short, crisp, provocative, entertaining presentations highlighting stories from a variety of local organizations, nonprofits, and community leaders. The not-to-be-missed I-Engage Talks session will offer a fascinating and entertaining local San Diego perspective from a diversity of topics and community agents of change. 1. From Ridge to Reef: Education and Community-Based Conservation 9:00 a.m.–9:10 a.m. Dr. Christine Browne-Nunez, Chief Social Science Researcher, Conservation Education Division, Institute for Conservation Research, San Diego Zoo Global 2. Reimagining Borders and Nationalism 9:10 a.m.–9:20 a.m. Joseph Ramirez, Program Coordinator, Cross Cultural Center , University of California-San Diego 3. One idea. One person. One action can change the world 9:20 a.m.–9:30 a.m. Jenny Amaraneni, Director, SOLO eyewear 4. Getting Students Stoked About Study Abroad 9:30 a.m.–9:40 a.m. Jess Ponting, Director, San Diego State University Center for Surf Research 5. San Diego-Tijuana Border Lessons Learned for International Educators 9:40 a.m.–9:50 a.m. Richard Kly, President and CEO, International Community Foundation 6. Journey from Sagag to San Diego 9:50 a.m.–10:00 a.m. Ahmed Sahid, President, Somali Family Services 7. Starchild: An Asian American Personal Journey 10:00 a.m.–10:10 a.m. Lee Ann Kim, Director and Founder, PacificArts Movement 8. Blurred Borders: Inspiring Places, Spaces, and Faces 10:10 a.m.–10:20 a.m. Enrique Meza, Program Director, San Diego Diplomacy Council 9. San Diego and the Craft Beer Industry 10:20 a.m.–10:30 a.m. Mitch Steele, Stone Brewing Company Have you “liked” NAFSA on Facebook ?  Get Connected! Bradley Moon is the Local Arrangements Team (LAT) communications chair for NAFSA’s 2014 Annual Conference & Expo. Bradley was born and raised in Des Moines, Iowa, and spent a number of years living, studying, and working abroad. He earned his master’s degree from Hawai`i Pacific University in Honolulu and began his higher education career in in 2005 after touring with Cirque du Soleil throughout Europe and North America. Moon is currently the assistant director of international recruitment and communication at San Diego State University, having worked for Hawai`i Pacific University and the University of Hawai`i – Leeward Community College.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

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Bon Appétit!

by Paul Joseph on April 14, 2014 · 0 comments

I think it is universally acknowledged that one of the most important (and enjoyable) aspects of living and traveling abroad is the cuisine. As I was wandering around Aix yesterday on a beautiful Sunday afternoon, I really realized just how food-oriented it is (perhaps because there’s simply not much else to do besides sit at a café on Cours Mirabeau, participate in the all-too-common practice of people-watching, and enjoy an Aixoise dish at the most leisurely pace possible). It is a town in which aesthetics reign supreme–the pastries are works of art, the landscape is a living painting, the people are chic but relaxed. So where does one go to partake in this delightfully delicious cuisine? If you don’t feel like consulting TripAdvisor the next time you’re looking for a place to eat, here’s a few secret finds that I’ll gladly pass along. Crêpes à GoGo First, whether you’ve been granted the gift of a very prominent sweet tooth or not, stopping by Crêpes à GoGo and ordering the L’Africaine chocolate crêpe with whipped cream is an absolute MUST. While Crêpes à GoGo is hardly a secret, hidden gem, it is located underground and can be a bit hard to find. Don’t let the tunnel running below the road discourage you, though. I must confess, the first time I stumbled upon this place, I think I stood mesmerized in front of the counter for at least 5 minutes, watching the ever-so-smooth crêpe-making process. Fortunately for my wallet and my waist, my daily route to class doesn’t involve passing here, but every time I do walk by, I almost always give in to the sweet smelling aroma of fresh whipped cream and melted dark chocolate. Now, having been inspired by the sheer deliciousness of the savory crêpes, I’ve started to make my own at home, and am proud to say that they could surely rival Crêpes à Gogo–or at least I like to think so. Sunday afternoon picnic with a bunch of baguettes For the best baguettes in all of Aix, there’s one bakery that I found fairly early on in the semester. It’s located on Rue d’Italie and has “Boulangerie” written in black all over the exterior. There’s something unearthly about these baguettes… I have absolutely no idea what their secret is, but whatever it is, it’s genius. The best time to go is right after they’ve taken a tray of fresh loaves out of the oven, so that they’re warm to the touch. I’ve learned that the way to judge bread around here is to listen. Break off a piece of the baguette and see if it crackles. The outside should be a bit crispy, while the inside is warm and doughy. Now this place is actually right on my route to class, and for only 75 centimes, I’ve many-a-morning stopped by and gotten a freshly made baguette (that rarely lasts me through the day). Without a doubt, I will miss this Boulangerie dearly. First time trying Pizza Capri Located right off of Cours Mirabeau, there is a pizza stand called Pizza Capri. Having been to five different cities in Italy for my spring break, I now feel like my judgment of the perfect slice of pizza has gained much more worth. And I must say, after trying some of the best of the best in Italy, I think Pizza Capri is certainly among my favorite (and not too pricey, either!). Personally a lover of mushrooms, I always go for the mushroom topped pizza, but I don’t believe you could really go wrong with any choice. The vendors heat the slice up just before they hand it to you, and make sure it’s soft and warm. Unfortunately, I don’t think I could possibly ever recreate (or even slightly mimic) the pizza at Pizza Capri, but that just makes it that much more delicious!

[via CEA Study Abroad Programs]

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Parc de La Torse, Aix en Provence Back home, I always used to meet my parents and my little siblings at church every Sunday morning. For the first time in a long time, after my first week in Aix, I went to mass on Sunday  without  my family there to greet me. No row of girls sitting all in a line next to Mom and Dad, no gleeful glance from my littlest sister upon spotting me walk in. At that moment, I missed the familiar. I missed home! But here I was, in an absolutely beautiful–not-to-mention ancient–French cathedral, with great, big tapestries hanging on the stone walls, an enormous organ bellowing behind me, and a beautifully lit altar before me. This was home! It was unfamiliar, and yet so familiar. I had said when I left the States that I wanted to be stretched and challenged, that I wanted to come out of myself by being around different people, immersed in a different culture. I’ve been finding that, yes, I’m discovering more about myself after being removed from the familiar, precisely by learning about what is dear to me, what is  home , since I’ve been away from it. It seems that this is when you really know something–when you’re removed from it. What is dear to you is made clear, whether it be what you left behind or what you’re discovering anew. My street: Rue Cardinale, Aix en Provence It’s easy to feel homesick, disoriented, maybe even misplaced when you start your study abroad program. You miss things from back home, but now you have to adapt to this new home. Maybe it hasn’t become a real home yet, but fret not! How can you make this new place a home away from home? So often we have chances to take leaps of faith, to come out of our comfort zone entirely; and it can be terrifying, but almost always pays off. Why not talk to those kids after class instead of leaving right away, or explore your city and discover your favorite spots, or just walk around and get lost? Sometimes wandering is the best way to discover, the quickest route to new surprises. And above all, it’s so crucial to put your fears aside—of fitting in, of adapting perfectly to this new place, of never making a single embarrassing blunder. Enjoy it all right now, in the moment, and don’t worry about looking silly.   Book market, Aix en Provence Slowly but surely I can feel Aix becoming my home from home. I want it to become familiar, so that I feel like I belong, but I don’t want to lose the sense of wonder that comes when you see or experience something unfamiliar. Maybe that’s an even more important bit of truth–that things which are dear to us, even though they may be familiar, should never be marveled at any less. Wonder is such a gift, and it is very present now, as I’m still uncovering new secrets and ways of life in Aix. But should it ever fade, even when I become more accustomed to it? My family and friends are the most familiar things on earth, and yet, being apart from them, I am filled with more wonder at the gift of them. You will also start to become familiar with things in your city: daily happenings, ways of life, even just little spots here and there that you love to visit. But as your city becomes more and more like home, never forget the many gifts that it will always offer. Home from home; this is Aix! I am beginning to love it dearly, my town of water, town of art.

[via CEA Study Abroad Programs]

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I got to thinking the other day, and realized that I have yet to blog about one of my very favorite parts of studying abroad! It’s the people you meet; there’s something about traveling that brings people together.  Emily Blume and Ashlynn Polanco, St. George’s Bay, Malta Sometimes it’s fleeting, hearing a rare bit of English outside the boulangerie or seeing a fellow backpack-wearing American on Cours Mirabeau. You exchange that little nod, the one that says something like kudos, fellow traveler . Because we’re in the same boat. The backpacker, the Canadian bread-buyer, and me.  St. Julien’s Bay, Malta T wo weekends ago, two friends and I traveled on a whim to a country two months ago I never knew existed. Malta is a cluster of islands just off the boot of Italy that is  rich with history, with megalithic temples that date back to between  3000 BC and 700 BC, many of which  are UNESCO World Heritage Sites . The people speak both English and Maltese, and many of them can be found running along St. Julien’s pier around 7:30 in the morning, waving to sailors on brightly-colored boats. Of all the places I’ve been, Malta may have captivated me the most.The landscape is harsh and imposing, the architecture bleached to a dusty beige. Flowers and icons of saints fill the windowsills. The water is as clear as glass, spilling over white sands and rocks, splashing against dramatic and imposing cliffs. Blue Lagoon, Malta N 0w silly as it may sound, I’ve found that taking pictures is a fantastic way to meet poeple. And standing on the cliffs of Blue Lagoon, three guys around our age ask us to take a photo of them. They were all from England, visiting for the weekend. So we got to talking, planning to meet them for drinks later that night. Contact information all set up, we say our goodbyes and leave to catch the bus. But it flies by right as we get to the stop, so we’re left squinting in the sun. But lo and behold, here come are our new British friends, walking towards their car. “Missed our bus,” we holler, “next one’s not for an hour and a half.” They look at us, and look back at their car. “Well, you might could fit… Want a ride?” And to the jealous glares of the others waiting at the bus stop, sprint to their tiny car. With two in the front and three in the back, I slide onto Ashlynn’s lap with legs across Emily’s. Which was all good and fine until I realize that in order to back up the car and avoid being stopped by cops, I have to lay across the back with my head in one of the guys’ laps. The car peels out of the lot, and as I’m thrown down and covered with someone’s jean jacket, he plays with my hair and grins,”Come here often?” Oh jeez. So off we went, traipsing across the Maltese country-side on the wrong side of the road for two hours, blasting Macklemore, stuffed like sardines a clown car with three Brits who can’t read a map.  I f you ever get the chance to go to Malta, rent a car (or better yet, hitch a ride) and just get lost on the dusty roads. Bonus points if you roll down the windows, drive just a little too fast, and ditch the map; sometimes you have to get a little lost to find what you’re looking for. Golden Bay, Malta T he next day, we went to the beach at Golden Bay. It’s a half-moon inlet with fine white sands enclosed with rocky cliffs on either side that are overflowing with mimosas. And as we were walking, we met Evan, an American visiting his mom in Malta. And before we knew it, we were all running together through the flower fields. Sadly though, we were never able to meet up for dinner since we couldn’t find him on Facebook (sorry Evan!). O n our very last day, while sitting in the cafe taking Instagrams of our drinks like typical tourists, two men, one with a pristine English accent and a hearty laugh, the other bookish with graying hair and a quiet yet thick Maltese intonation, began talking to us, eager to rave about their country with tourists. It turns out they were both Maltese, one who had studied in England but had grown up in St. Julien’s, the other a retired history lecturer. In just an hour, we were given a list of places to go, monuments to see, local beaches to check out, and two eager and willing tour guides. All under the cloud of a plane to catch in two hours. It was such a shame to have to leave our new friends. But that quick connection was incredible–just from a conversation in a cafe, we now have two tour guides in Malta, along with a place to stay should we ever find ourselves on its rocky cliffs again.  Moral of the story is that, while studying abroad, take every chance you can to talk to the people you meet, and keep up those connections. There is no better way to learn about a country from a local, and no better way to get lost than with fellow tourists. It’s the people that make the experience, and there’s always time for a little culture sharing. And who knows? You may see them again someday.  Emily Blume, Blue Lagoon, Mala Lindsay Bayne is the Spring 2014 CEA MOJO in Aix-en-Provence, France. She is a junior at the University of Pittsburgh. 

[via CEA Study Abroad Programs]

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The Minnesota International Student Association (MISA) organized their first Cultural Bazaar to showcase the different student groups and associations around the U of MN and celebrate cultural diversity. This video was created by a current UMN student, Valeria Lopez. Check out this fun event! For more information about The Minnesota International Student Association visit: https://www.facebook.com/misa.umn?fref=ts.

[via EducationUSA News Feed]

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