State bank of India (SBI) Probationary Officers – This is the Junior Management Level direct entry point for dynamic young graduates. A Probationary officer gets exposed to challenging assignment as also gets the opportunity to involve in nation building developmental activities. The opportunities include working in Personal banking, Rural Banking, Credit, Forex, Treasury etc.

[via Colleges in India Admission Alerts]

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Melbourne: While US and UK continue attracting the highest number of students from India, Australia has seen a year-on-year escalation in students enrollment from the Indian territory this year.

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The Supreme Court delivered a victory to representative democracy today, ruling in Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission that under the Constitution’s Elections Clause, an independent body, and not only a state legislature, has the power to create voting districts. In 2000, the people of Arizona voted by referendum to create an independent redistricting commission to draw voting districts, taking the process away from the legislature and outside of the political pulls associated with redistricting efforts. The Arizona legislature sued to overturn the results of the referendum in order to regain its authority to draw voting districts. Today’s decision ensures that independent commissions remain an option in the fight to eliminate political gerrymandering and begins to reverse the trend in which “representatives choose their voters instead of voters choosing their representatives.” For too long, the United States’ inability to address political gerrymandering has sullied our reputation as a standard bearer of democracy. At NAFSA, we stand among those who see the United States as part of the global community, and believe our own democracy should be an example of what works. A succinct example provided by The Economist demonstrates the way gerrymandered districts skew our democracy, making Congress less representative of the voters. Imagine a state with five congressional seats and only 25 voters in each. That makes 125 voters. Sixty-five are Republicans, 60 are Democrats. You might think a fair election in such a state would produce, say, three Republican representatives and two Democrats. Now imagine you can draw the district boundaries any way you like. The only condition is that you must keep 25 voters in each one. If you were a Republican, you could carve up the state so there were 13 Republicans and 12 Democrats per district. Your party would win every seat narrowly. Republicans, five-nil. Now imagine you were a Democrat. If you put 15 Republicans in one district, you could then divide the rest of the state so that each district had 13 Democrats and 12 Republicans. Democrats, four-one. Same state, same number of districts, same party affiliation: completely different results. All you need is the power to draw district lines. And that is what America provides: a process, called redistricting, which, through back-room negotiations too boring for most voters to think about, can distort the democratic system itself.” Such partisan gerrymandering transforms representative institutions into fiefdoms that mute the voices of the minority. The result is “ hyperpartisan districts ” in which electoral competition comes not from another party but from primary challenges, forcing members of Congress to lunge to the far poles of their party in order to hold on to their seats. Compromise, and a truly representative democracy, become harder to realize. Many national and international bodies have proposed standards for voting districts in which citizens are fairly and meaningfully represented. Beyond ensuring that every vote counts, maintaining “ communities of interest ”—groups that share “common social, cultural, racial, economic, geographic, or other concerns”—is an important consideration in redistricting. Keeping districts compact and relying on geographic features also contribute to rational redistricting. Transparency in redistricting provides credibility, community input and buy-in.  Nowhere in any proposal for redistricting “best practices” is a system that can be used to discriminate against any population or guarantee the election of any individual or political party. Our politically infused redistricting system has also made us unique among democracies. Independent redistricting commissions are the norm , not the exception in democracies around the globe and partisan legislatures rarely have a role in the process. Today’s ruling gives states the option to manage redistricting in a less partisan manner, reaffirming our democratic values and leading us toward a more perfect union. Lisa Rosenberg is the senior director for public policy at NAFSA: Association of International Educators.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

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This summer, Keystone students Bryan McIntyre and Kristy Keller will be interning at Sodexo headquarters in Madrid, Spain.  This program is unique and only offered to Keystone students each year.  Follow their blogs as and hear about their adventures working in an office in another country and learning about the culture, language, and history of Spain.  http://bmacinaction.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default    https://niftyiskristy.wordpress.com/

[via Who’s Abroad!]

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By Carol Crsoby When I review students’ résumés, I usually find action statements similar to these: – Manage staff – Attend weekly meetings – Tutored students in algebra and calculus You might say, “What is wrong with this?” Well, if I am a recruiter and have over 300 résumés to sort through to hire one person, I am not interested in hiring just anyone. I want to hire the one person who will bring their best to the job, the person who will go above and beyond the job description, the person who will give me more than the other 299 applicants. For this reason, you cannot be modest on your résumé. You need to think about what makes you better than anyone else who has ever held your previous job positions and sell it to me. For those who struggle to do this on their own, use one of my favorite acronyms: WWYMS ( W hat W ould Y our M other S ay). Mothers are renowned for being the ones most likely to boast to friends and family about what they perceive are your greatest accomplishments. I can hear her now: “Steven manages five staff during his shift…and he only began his job THREE MONTHS AGO! He is their DREAM COME TRUE!” Using the words of loving mothers across the world, the previous action statements would improve exponentially: Within three months of hire, promoted to manager of staff of five. Received annual salary increases based on positive evaluations. Attended weekly meetings, participated in brainstorming sessions for fundraising program for annual campus carnival. Efforts resulted in raising $4,000 for program. Tutored up to 10 students 15 hours a week in algebra and calculus while attending school full-time. Ninety-five percent of clients raised grade in class by at least one letter. Can’t you just hear your mother boasting? Carol Crosby is Assistant Director in Career Services at Bridgewater State University. She has also worked in the field of student affairs at Wesleyan University, University of Connecticut, and Brandeis University. Collectively, her experience in career counseling has spanned over 12 years. In 2013, she received a Fulbright grant to visit career services offices in universities across Germany and is currently working with the Ministry of Education in Belize on career development modules for at risk students. She received her M.S. in College Student Personnel from the University of Rhode Island and her B.A. in English from Wheaton College in Norton, MA.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

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New Delhi, 09 June, 2015 – British Airways has announced double baggage allowance for students travelling from India to study abroad in countries such as the UK , Europe , US or Canada.

[via International – IndiaEduNews.net]

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The scholarship is available to Indian students applying for the full-time MBA programme for the September 2015 academic year.

[via International – IndiaEduNews.net]

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Today we visited El Yunque National Forest.   El Yunque is the only tropical rain forest in the U.S. National Forest system and has been a federal forest reserve for over 100 years.   Our first stop in El Yunque was to visit La Coca Falls.   Due to the dry weather the region has been having, the falls were not running as they normally would, but it was still a beautiful sight.   Next we stopped at Yokahu tower which is an observation point in the forest that offers an amazing view of the forest.   After leaving the tower, we were given the opportunity to take the 2.4 mile hike to El Yunque peak. The hike normally takes 1.5-2 hours to reach the top and the same to get back down. With our pace, we managed to reach the top in a hour and back down in just 45 minutes.   It was a fun, but a tiring hike that was worth every minute of it.   After returning to the bottom of the trail, we went to cool off in the river at a swimming hole in the reserve.   There was a rope tied off a tree on the one side that people were using to swing and jump in. It was interesting to see that even young children, that appeared to be 5-6 years old, were allowed to climb up and do this.   Of course a day in the rain forest isn’t complete until you get caught in the rain and that’s exactly what happened on the walk back to the van.   It seemed to come out of nowhere, but was refreshing on a hot day. I did learn a lot of interesting things during the trip to the forest such as at different elevations there is drastically different amounts of rain. The higher elevations of the forest can see over 250 inches of rain in a year while the lower elevations typically get 50-60 inches of rain.   It was also intriguing to find out that unlike most rain forests there are no large animals in El Yunque.   This is because Puerto Rico was formed from volcanic activity during the Triassic period and there has never been a land bridge to any continent so all the animals in Puerto Rico arrived by flying, swimming or floating.   The largest mammals in El Yunque are mongooses, rats and bats.   But, there are reptiles such as the Puerto Rican Boa which can grow up to six feet.   Also, it was very surprising to learn that there are no poisonous animals or insects within the forest.

[via Who’s Abroad!]

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Hola de Puerto Rico! Today was our service learning day where we had the opportunity to go and visit Sister Isolina’s Center. Arriving at the Center, we were introduced to the new director, Sister Mildred who to our surprise and hers can speak English very well.  She kept apologizing to us, but we reassured her that she was doing great. Before we were given the tour we where able to meet the historian of the Center who has also been around since the founder, Sister Isolina started the program. She spoke highly of all the programs and work that Isolina put into the Center and while taking the tour, you can really see how much they care about this place.  The people in Ponce really use and rely on the center for help and learning. During the tour, they showed us the high school which was for kids up to that age of 21 that had dropped out of school to come and finish their schooling and get a degree. While in the school they showed different class rooms such as the English room.  I was amazed at what their work load is!  I don’t even think I could do some of the things that these kids had to do.  Sister Mildred then showed us some of the art that they work on and it’s amazing.                  For lunch we went to Cesar’s BBQ chicken thanks to one of the sister recommending it to Joyce. The food in Puerto Rico is heaven. I honestly don’t know how I’m going to go back to eating American food. At the end of lunch we even got a group picture with the chef and his son. After getting back to the hotel, we went to a couple shops that were in la plaza. In every town they have there own plaza which has a church and fire station in the middle of the town. La plaza is different in each town some are very small and you almost can’t recognize it and others are huge and beautiful.  Estar en Puerto Rico ha abierto verdaderamente mis ojos a las diferentes culturas y estoy agradecido por el ágape para estar en este viaje. Ponce es ponce y el resto es parqueo.

[via Who’s Abroad!]

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Today we woke up at 6 a.m.  to leave the condo by 7:30 a.m. Let me tell you, it’s difficult waking up so early since I haven’t had an 8 a.m. since first semester, freshmen year. But it’s exciting because it makes our days here feel longer and obviously we don’t want to leave this beautiful island. We’re on our way to the court. All the criminal justice majors including myself were excited about seeing how  different the court system deals with things compared to the States. We were able to visit the marshals office, criminal court, domestic violence court, the jury room and the investigation area, which is cases that are an emergency and need to be dealt with right then and there. We got the chance to sit in on three different cases. It was honestly the highlight of our day! I cannot explain to you how interesting these different cases were. They were all in Spanish and it got a little difficult trying to translate it to the group, but they were still able to understand what was going on. We then had lunch in the cafeteria at the court, which was delicious! After the court, we went to the Zar Zar prison. We were a little scared and intimidated because we didn’t know what to expect. We had to take off all our jewelry before we went in. It got more scarier when the guys had to get patted down and the girls got searched by a female guard. At the prison we were able to see where they make wood sculptures, paintings, candles, etc. to sell. Actually some of the group bought a lot of their knick-naks. It was surprising to see how free these prisoners were. The warden told us that they need about 60 more guards to work there. They then showed us the cafeteria, where the food is prepared and kept. The hospital area, where they get medication, root canals, and glasses if they need it. They have a beautiful green house and sell the crops growing such as lettuce and cilantro that is used in almost all Hispanic dishes. They also had beautiful orange trees growing. It’s been a great day, a lot of interesting facts that I would’ve never thought of. We’ve all been having a wonderful time on this beautiful island. Saludos de Puerto Rico.

[via Who’s Abroad!]

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