At 10:30 a.m. on Monday, July 20, the Cuban flag was raised outside of the newly official Cuban Embassy in Washington, D.C., for the first time in more than 50 years. The crowd erupted into applause and cheers of “iViva Cuba!” Nearly ten hours later, I walked up to the embassy on my way home from the NAFSA office and was happy to see that the celebrations had not died down. A large crowd was still chanting, singing, drumming and dancing on the sidewalk. Colorful signs calling for the end of both the travel ban and trade embargo were still weaved through the posts of the fence in front of the embassy building. I was proud to personally witness such a historic moment . The opening of the Cuban and American embassies on Monday is an important step forward toward fully normalizing relations between the governments of the United States and Cuba. As NAFSA Executive Director and CEO Marlene M. Johnson said at the recent NAFSA conference in Boston, “Engagement, not isolation, is the best way to work toward human rights, prosperity, and security for all.” In a similar ceremony to what happened Monday in Washington, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry plans to raise the American flag over the new U.S. Embassy in Havana on August 14. Like most Americans, I won’t be able to see it in person. The travel ban still exists, making Cuba the only country in the world that the U.S. government prevents Americans from visiting. Lifting the travel ban must be part of the reengagement between the United States and Cuba. While the opening of educational exchanges to Cuba in 2011 was a monumental advocacy victory, licensing requirements for academic travel and other categories of travel still exist, making it difficult for Americans to visit the country and experience it firsthand. At NAFSA we believe that travel is inherently educational, and that travel is a right. That is why we are continuing to work with a diverse coalition of business, religious, agriculture, trade, and travel organizations, who are advocating for lifting the travel ban and embargo of Cuba. There is a bill pending in both the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives right now that would lift the travel ban to Cuba. It is called the Freedom to Travel to Cuba Act ( S. 299 ; H.R. 664 ). In order for this bill to move, it needs more cosponsors and support. More than 100 international educators came to Washington, D.C. for NAFSA’s Advocacy Day last March and lobbied their members of Congress to support the Freedom to Travel to Cuba Act. Since then, 23 Representatives and 25 Senators signed on to the bill. But we still need more. You can be a part of this movement by sending this email to your Senators and this email to your Representative , urging them to cosponsor the Freedom to Travel to Cuba Act. [VIDEO] Dancing outside the newly official Cuban embassy #Cuba #EndTheTravelBan @ EmbaCubaUS http://t.co/XDn2Rfn6iZ — Katie O'Connell (@KatieAtNAFSA) July 21, 2015

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

Follow us @educationheat – lists / @sectorheat

{ 0 comments }

Millions of foreign students who dream of working in Britain along with studying in publicly funded colleges may find their dreams getting shattered.

[via International – IndiaEduNews.net]

Follow us @educationheat – lists / @sectorheat

{ 0 comments }

Many institutes in India offer the five year PhD programs, whereas the six-year Integrated MS-PhD programs are available only at a handful of places . Typically the competition for the seats available is high due to a perceived exclusivity of these programs. See PhD Admissions

[via Colleges in India Admission Alerts]

Follow us @educationheat – lists / @sectorheat

{ 0 comments }

Could you use an elixir for disillusionment with the U.S. political system or the hand-wringing about the future of the United States? Listen to “ Abdi and the Golden Ticket ,” a story broadcasted on NPR’s “This American Life” about Abdi Nor, a Somali refugee living in Kenya who won the Diversity Visa (DV) program lottery. The goal of the DV lottery, when it was created by Congress in 1990, was to diversify the immigrant population by allowing people from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States to apply for one of 55,000 green cards available annually under the program. Unlike the vast majority of others who apply to live permanently in the United States, DV applicants aren’t required to have family already here or an employer sponsoring them. Each year, during a one-month filing period, eight to eleven million people apply. Let that sink in for a moment: in one month, eight to eleven million people enter a potentially life-changing lottery for the chance to “win” one of 55,000 green cards. Actually, they are vying for 50,000 green cards because 5,000 have been allocated for use under a different program, lessening their odds even further. Winning the DV lottery is no guarantee of a future in the United States. As Abdi’s story demonstrates, it is only the beginning of what can be a harrowing, even dangerous path to life in this country. As a matter of policy, some see it as illogical, if not absurd to grant green cards in this way. Others see it as a tiny way to tip the scales to help those who didn’t have the good fortune to be born in the United States or have access to the education that enables them to immigrate because an employer has sponsored them. No matter what side you’re on, Abdi’s story is a fascinating glimpse into the luck and perseverance needed for the chance to live and work in America. Abdi’s excitement when he learns that he has won the Diversity Visa lottery is a humbling reminder of the hope many have about the opportunities this country offers, and his story is a sobering indication of the challenges of turning that hope into a reality.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

Follow us @educationheat – lists / @sectorheat

{ 0 comments }

State bank of India (SBI) Probationary Officers – This is the Junior Management Level direct entry point for dynamic young graduates. A Probationary officer gets exposed to challenging assignment as also gets the opportunity to involve in nation building developmental activities. The opportunities include working in Personal banking, Rural Banking, Credit, Forex, Treasury etc.

[via Colleges in India Admission Alerts]

Follow us @educationheat – lists / @sectorheat

{ 0 comments }

Melbourne: While US and UK continue attracting the highest number of students from India, Australia has seen a year-on-year escalation in students enrollment from the Indian territory this year.

[via International – IndiaEduNews.net]

Follow us @educationheat – lists / @sectorheat

{ 0 comments }

The Supreme Court delivered a victory to representative democracy today, ruling in Arizona State Legislature v. Arizona Independent Redistricting Commission that under the Constitution’s Elections Clause, an independent body, and not only a state legislature, has the power to create voting districts. In 2000, the people of Arizona voted by referendum to create an independent redistricting commission to draw voting districts, taking the process away from the legislature and outside of the political pulls associated with redistricting efforts. The Arizona legislature sued to overturn the results of the referendum in order to regain its authority to draw voting districts. Today’s decision ensures that independent commissions remain an option in the fight to eliminate political gerrymandering and begins to reverse the trend in which “representatives choose their voters instead of voters choosing their representatives.” For too long, the United States’ inability to address political gerrymandering has sullied our reputation as a standard bearer of democracy. At NAFSA, we stand among those who see the United States as part of the global community, and believe our own democracy should be an example of what works. A succinct example provided by The Economist demonstrates the way gerrymandered districts skew our democracy, making Congress less representative of the voters. Imagine a state with five congressional seats and only 25 voters in each. That makes 125 voters. Sixty-five are Republicans, 60 are Democrats. You might think a fair election in such a state would produce, say, three Republican representatives and two Democrats. Now imagine you can draw the district boundaries any way you like. The only condition is that you must keep 25 voters in each one. If you were a Republican, you could carve up the state so there were 13 Republicans and 12 Democrats per district. Your party would win every seat narrowly. Republicans, five-nil. Now imagine you were a Democrat. If you put 15 Republicans in one district, you could then divide the rest of the state so that each district had 13 Democrats and 12 Republicans. Democrats, four-one. Same state, same number of districts, same party affiliation: completely different results. All you need is the power to draw district lines. And that is what America provides: a process, called redistricting, which, through back-room negotiations too boring for most voters to think about, can distort the democratic system itself.” Such partisan gerrymandering transforms representative institutions into fiefdoms that mute the voices of the minority. The result is “ hyperpartisan districts ” in which electoral competition comes not from another party but from primary challenges, forcing members of Congress to lunge to the far poles of their party in order to hold on to their seats. Compromise, and a truly representative democracy, become harder to realize. Many national and international bodies have proposed standards for voting districts in which citizens are fairly and meaningfully represented. Beyond ensuring that every vote counts, maintaining “ communities of interest ”—groups that share “common social, cultural, racial, economic, geographic, or other concerns”—is an important consideration in redistricting. Keeping districts compact and relying on geographic features also contribute to rational redistricting. Transparency in redistricting provides credibility, community input and buy-in.  Nowhere in any proposal for redistricting “best practices” is a system that can be used to discriminate against any population or guarantee the election of any individual or political party. Our politically infused redistricting system has also made us unique among democracies. Independent redistricting commissions are the norm , not the exception in democracies around the globe and partisan legislatures rarely have a role in the process. Today’s ruling gives states the option to manage redistricting in a less partisan manner, reaffirming our democratic values and leading us toward a more perfect union. Lisa Rosenberg is the senior director for public policy at NAFSA: Association of International Educators.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

Follow us @educationheat – lists / @sectorheat

{ 0 comments }

This summer, Keystone students Bryan McIntyre and Kristy Keller will be interning at Sodexo headquarters in Madrid, Spain.  This program is unique and only offered to Keystone students each year.  Follow their blogs as and hear about their adventures working in an office in another country and learning about the culture, language, and history of Spain.  http://bmacinaction.blogspot.com/feeds/posts/default    https://niftyiskristy.wordpress.com/

[via Who’s Abroad!]

Follow us @educationheat – lists / @sectorheat

{ 0 comments }

By Carol Crsoby When I review students’ résumés, I usually find action statements similar to these: – Manage staff – Attend weekly meetings – Tutored students in algebra and calculus You might say, “What is wrong with this?” Well, if I am a recruiter and have over 300 résumés to sort through to hire one person, I am not interested in hiring just anyone. I want to hire the one person who will bring their best to the job, the person who will go above and beyond the job description, the person who will give me more than the other 299 applicants. For this reason, you cannot be modest on your résumé. You need to think about what makes you better than anyone else who has ever held your previous job positions and sell it to me. For those who struggle to do this on their own, use one of my favorite acronyms: WWYMS ( W hat W ould Y our M other S ay). Mothers are renowned for being the ones most likely to boast to friends and family about what they perceive are your greatest accomplishments. I can hear her now: “Steven manages five staff during his shift…and he only began his job THREE MONTHS AGO! He is their DREAM COME TRUE!” Using the words of loving mothers across the world, the previous action statements would improve exponentially: Within three months of hire, promoted to manager of staff of five. Received annual salary increases based on positive evaluations. Attended weekly meetings, participated in brainstorming sessions for fundraising program for annual campus carnival. Efforts resulted in raising $4,000 for program. Tutored up to 10 students 15 hours a week in algebra and calculus while attending school full-time. Ninety-five percent of clients raised grade in class by at least one letter. Can’t you just hear your mother boasting? Carol Crosby is Assistant Director in Career Services at Bridgewater State University. She has also worked in the field of student affairs at Wesleyan University, University of Connecticut, and Brandeis University. Collectively, her experience in career counseling has spanned over 12 years. In 2013, she received a Fulbright grant to visit career services offices in universities across Germany and is currently working with the Ministry of Education in Belize on career development modules for at risk students. She received her M.S. in College Student Personnel from the University of Rhode Island and her B.A. in English from Wheaton College in Norton, MA.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

Follow us @educationheat – lists / @sectorheat

{ 0 comments }

New Delhi, 09 June, 2015 – British Airways has announced double baggage allowance for students travelling from India to study abroad in countries such as the UK , Europe , US or Canada.

[via International – IndiaEduNews.net]

Follow us @educationheat – lists / @sectorheat

{ 0 comments }