By Michele Friedmann There are so many great neighborhoods in Denver — one week is simply not enough time to check them all out! From beautiful parks and hip restaurants to trendy music venues and a funky art scene, Denver has it all! Here a few of my favorite spots. Washington Park This neighborhood is named after Denver’s most popular park. The dozens of runners you’ll see on a sunny day will inspire you to lace up your running shoes and jog the 2.6-mile path that follows the perimeter of the park. With its beautiful 165-acre sprawl of lakes, flower gardens, and tree-lined paths, this is an ideal place to relax or simply enjoy being outside. On weekends when the weather is nice, you’ll find me on the volleyball courts with dozens of others. Nearby on South Pearl Street, you can enjoy galleries, cocktail bars, boutiques, and high-end clothing stores. Highlands This is my favorite neighborhood to check out bars and restaurants, grab a coffee, and just hang out! Victorian-style homes, beautiful parks, independent shops and bars, art galleries, and restaurants can be found in this quaint quarter. The districts to explore are Highlands Square, Tennyson Street, and Lower Highlands (LoHi). I’m lucky enough to live on Tennyson Street and I love to stop in one of the coffee shops (Allegro is my favorite), listen to the live music at Local 46 Bar and Biergarten, or grab a glass of wine and an appetizer at West End Tap House. RiNo/ River North Art District I’ve only recently discovered this popular neighborhood—located just north of downtown Denver—and I love it! In this area, you can find historic warehouses and factories that now house creative business, funky breweries, shops, art galleries, and even a church! Impressive graffiti colors the walls of most buildings. In addition to strolling and checking out the artwork, I recommend visiting The Source —a collection of restaurants, markets, artisan shops and even a craft brewery. Great video: RiNo is “where art is made. ” Santa Fe Continuing with the art theme, Santa Fe is home to 60 art galleries, studios, and innovative businesses. The Latino influence in this neighborhood is evident from the colorful murals to the tasty neighborhood restaurants. My favorite is Palacio Café , which has authentic Mexican food at a great price. , During the art walks held on the first Friday of every month, art galleries display local crafts, provide opportunities to meet and mingle with artists, and offer complimentary wine. If you enjoy art, this neighborhood is worth checking out! Cherry Creek A fun, albeit pricey, neighborhood is Cherry Creek. The tree-lined streets, impeccable cleanliness, high-end restaurants and shops, and charming feel drive up the housing and rental demand in this area. While exploring, you can enjoy impressive art galleries, stores from international fashion brands, relaxing spas, and luxury hotels. Personally, I love people watching at Second Home Kitchen + Bar inside the JW Marriott. You never know whom you will meet there! The well-known Cherry Creek Shopping Center features 160 stores and will satisfy every type of shopper. South Broadway South Broadway and the Baker district are home to neighborhood taverns, vintage clothing stores, bookstores, ethnic restaurants, craft shops, and hip live music venues. If you’re into shopping for antiques, this is your place! South of Alameda Street you’ll find “Antique Row,” which has almost 100 antique stores packed into 18 blocks. My favorite cinema, The Mayan Theatre, is also in this neighborhood. This theater, built in 1930, features independent and foreign language films and is one of the country’s three remaining theaters designed in the Art Deco Mayan Revival style. It’s the most interesting theater I’ve ever been inside of! I also enjoy bowling, socializing, and playing table tennis with friends at Punch Bowl Social , a large entertainment venue. Michele Friedmann is the Local Arrangements Team (LAT) communications chair for the NAFSA 2016 Annual Conference & Expo. Michele was born and raised in Reading, Pennsylvania. She attended Gettysburg College where her love for study abroad began. Michele spent a semester in Australia, circumnavigated the globe on Semester at Sea, and student taught in London. Michele earned a master’s degree from the School for International Training in the area of international education. She interned for Barcelona SAE as a program and student adviser. She has worked for the Institute of International Education and the Fulbright Foreign Student Program. Michele is currently the student and program manager for Global Players, a study abroad program geared toward student athletes.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

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As relations between the United States and Cuba continue to thaw and meaningful ties between both countries are strengthened, many believe that we’re on a glide path to full normalization. In less than two years, the Obama administration has issued five rounds of regulatory changes to ease travel and trade with Cuba. Embassies have reopened in each country. Cuba has been removed from the United States’ list of state sponsors of terrorism. Bipartisan congressional delegations, business leaders, and even the president, have visited the island in hopes of further cementing normalization. Proponents of education diplomacy are commended on a job well done. Ten years of continued advocacy by NAFSA, our partners, and the larger coalition advocating for normalized relations with Cuba, paid off. We in the field of international education got everything we could possibly want, right? Not quite. Not yet. While President Obama’s administrative measures and bold leadership have heralded a new era of U.S.-Cuba relations , long-term, meaningful ties will only be sustained by changing existing laws, which requires action from the U.S. Congress. Despite the progress of the past two years, the 50-year-old U.S. embargo on Cuba remains law and makes facilitating meaningful educational exchanges unnecessarily difficult. Though the president has relaxed restrictions, he can only do so within the bounds of current law. Should the next president have differing views on U.S.-Cuba engagement, he or she can still undo all of the progress that’s been made to date. If we are to fully and effectively engage with our neighbor a mere 90 miles from our shore, Congress must pass bills codifying the president’s efforts to permanently lift the remaining travel and trade restrictions with Cuba. Congressional action to end the U.S. embargo on Cuba is important to those of us in the field of international education for a number of reasons: 1. The embargo and travel ban create a chilling effect on our work Beyond perpetuating misunderstanding and mistrust, on a practical level, the embargo hinders meaningful collaborations. Investors, U.S. companies expanding their reach into Cuba, and the banks facilitating their financial transactions have all been cautious for fear of violating sanctions, thus hampering infrastructure development and constraining students’ day-to-day activities. The general ambiguity of the regulatory guidelines coupled with uncertainty of the next U.S. presidential administration only adds to the reluctance to break into the Cuban market. To fast-track normalization, U.S. enterprise needs assurances that the momentum of the Obama administration won’t be thwarted or stalled by the policies of the next president. Despite the recent regulatory reforms, travelers are still required to maintain a full-time schedule of authorized activities and retain their travel records, including receipts and logs of purchase, for five years . Such strict limitations create a chilling effect on basic travel and commerce. 2. The embargo and travel ban undermine our values As international educators, we believe that travel is inherently educational and is a human right. Everything we do in our everyday jobs is dedicated to creating a more welcoming and globally engaged United States and more peaceful world. But simply lifting the U.S. travel ban without ending the trade embargo is not enough to engage with the island and empower the Cuban people. We must take our advocacy efforts a step further. The trade embargo makes educational programs unnecessarily difficult to operate because of restrictions on banking and exports. Yet it is more than just the logistics of operating programs that is at stake in this debate. The free exchange of people and ideas is one of the core tenets of our field. The embargo undermines that tenet and inhibits our ability to build trust. It also undermines our leadership in the entire Western Hemisphere. Lifting the embargo will create an environment of goodwill, mutual trust, and cooperation, which is critical if we are to cultivate effective relationships between higher education institutions in both of our countries. 3. Ending the embargo and lifting the travel ban benefits the Cuban people As international educators, we believe that engagement, not isolation, is the right approach to foreign policy. Many of the existing financial barriers and operational hurdles (i.e. unifying Cuban currency and expanding telecommunications options for improved connectivity) must be rolled back by the Cubans. However, the U.S. embargo (or “blockade” as it’s known in Cuba) has choked the island economically and is used by the Cuban government as a justification to delay its own efforts at reciprocating our policy changes. Not only will removing the embargo boost the Cuban economy, it will empower the Cuban people, who can in turn put pressure on the government to be more responsive. 4. Ending the embargo and lifting the travel ban benefits the American people International educators know that the value of exchange programs and education diplomacy are bidirectional. Opening up U.S. travel and commerce with Cuba is to our mutual benefit. We stand to learn a lot from Cuba’s advancements in medicine , education , environmental science, and emergency responsiveness. Lifting the embargo would open up countless opportunities to build meaningful understanding and collaboration between our nations, in a political environment where we are free to engage and learn from each other. 5. The embargo and travel ban are just plain bad policy The United States’ policy of isolating Cuba is a relic of the Cold War. Its main objective was to squeeze out the Castro regime, but over 50 years later, the Castros remain in power, and it is the Cuban people who feel the economic effects of our sanctions. The embargo is failed policy, and the legislation to end it enjoys broad public and bipartisan support . Lifting the embargo is a cross-sector issue affecting numerous industries: agriculture, business, healthcare, and of course, education. That’s why NAFSA is working with a wide range of coalition partners to make the case for ending the travel ban and completely eliminating the embargo. Education has routinely proven to be a catalyst for improving our world. Institutions of higher learning can provide opportunities to support democracy, advance human rights and foster civil society. Executive branch policy changes cannot fully reclaim academic exchange participation, which remains considerably short of levels achieved in the 1990s . By passing the Freedom to Travel to Cuba Act and the Cuba Trade Act, Congress guarantees the American public the freedom to associate and conduct business with Cuba as freely as they are able to do with any other country in the world. How You Can Make a Difference Join the NAFSA Cuba Engagement Initiative , and sign up for the upcoming NAFSA Educators for Cuba Conference Call to get the latest information on legislation that will end the U.S. travel ban and trade embargo on Cuba. Learn how you can develop meaningful relationships with your members of Congress and make an impact on Capitol Hill. #EndtheTravelBan #EndtheEmbargo

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

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By Sora H. Friedman As one whose international education (IE) career is usually focused on helping rising professionals plan their future professional development, I recently had the opportunity to consider the opposite side of the coin. I got to see firsthand how NAFSA’s International Education Professional Competencies can be used as a guide for hiring new colleagues. Using the Competencies for this purpose gave me a chance to consider the breadth of the field of international education from my own vantage point, as well as what it might look like for my team and my potential new colleague. In 2015, NAFSA published its Competencies as a tool to help IE professionals plan their career development, and to assist supervisors and hiring managers as they evaluate their staff and assess their staffing needs. According to NAFSA, “the tool is organized into four key professional practice areas—Comprehensive Internationalization, Education Abroad, International Education Enrollment, and International Student and Scholar Services—as well as cross-cutting competencies . . . the shared skills and knowledge needed across all international education domains.” More specifically, the cross-cutting competencies include: advocacy, communication with stakeholders across campus and community, financial stewardship, human resources, information technology, intercultural communications, leadership, and strategic planning. The tool was also developed to be applied at various levels of planning and practice, including the individual, team, institution, and field levels. The Competencies tool was developed by NAFSA member-leaders and staff, and tested extensively across the Knowledge Communities. It can be applied at various levels of planning and practice, including the individual, team, institution, and field levels. The Competencies can be applied at the individual level as an assessment tool to measure one’s own skills or, as in my current situation, to assess the breadth and depth of a team’s skills in order to identify gaps and future needs. Managers can then plan more effectively for their staff’s professional development, as well as for hiring searches. The Competencies can also be applied at the institutional level to assess and plan for direct service delivery, the management of programs, and strategy and policy planning. Lastly, the Competencies can be applied at all levels to assess and strengthen our overall field, leading to its continued professionalization as a discipline of practice and study in the Academy. During my presentation in the Career Center at NAFSA 2016, I will explore how the Competencies can be used as a tool to assess current team skills, strengths, weaknesses, and gaps in order to assist with the professional development of current staff members and to plan for future hiring searches. In order to present the most comprehensive information possible, I am conducting a brief survey to gather data from IE supervisors and hiring managers who have used the Competencies tool in their own work. By engaging with as many people as possible about how they have used the tool within their own offices, we can learn from each other and better understand the various ways we can utilize the Competencies tool. You are invited to participate in the survey, which can be accessed here . It will take no more than five minutes to complete. Interested in learning more? Join me on Wednesday, June 1, from 10:00 a.m.–10:45 a.m., for my presentation, “ Using NAFSA’s International Education Professional Competencies for Hiring and Team Development ,” in the Career Center located in Four Seasons Ballroom 4. Learn the results of the first survey and participate in the discussion. Survey results will be shared in a future blog entry as well.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

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By Kara Johnson Over the past three weeks, I have been able to share some critical insight into a few select Current Topics Workshops (CTWs) that will take place in Denver at this year’s NAFSA Annual Conference & Expo. Through this 2016 Annual Conference Committee workshop preview series, we have explored the impact of experiential learning to facilitate intercultural understanding and the institutional benefits of building an international student and scholar crisis management plan. The final post in this series features Chelsea Kindred, director of alumni development and research at Academic Programs International (API) and lead trainer for the can’t-miss preconference workshop Current Trends in Education Abroad Alumni Programming . Chelsea is ready to lead this year’s workshop participants through various models of returnee engagement and demonstrate how returned education abroad students help to achieve larger institutional internationalization goals. Why is this CTW critical to international educators at this time? Kindred: As education abroad (EA) professionals, we agree that a student’s return from their international experience is a critical period. The opportunity to continue to engage the student in developmental learning – exploring exactly how and why their international experience offered them opportunities for growth – is a special one. It is also a time to help formulate a student’s vocabulary for their international experience – one that is applicable to career integration as well as advocacy for international experience in our country. Many universities and international education organizations have innovative strategies for attracting and engaging students during this critical learning period. We want to share these practices in the hope that our workshop participants will identify strategies that work well on their home campus or within their organization for successful returnee programming. On a macro level, we want to ensure our returned students are advocating in the best way possible for the outcomes international engagement imparts: intercultural skill development; an awareness of one’s place in the global community; an understanding of the personal and social responsibility that comes alongside this experience that fewer than 10 percent of American undergraduates have; and the application and integration of this experience into their professional career goals. What will a participant in your CTW walk away with that will enhance the work they do in their jobs? Kindred: Participants in our workshop will gain an in-depth understanding of the successful curricular and co-curricular models in place for engaging returned study abroad students. Participants will develop a ”returnee plan” for their home institution or organization, identify goals for this programming and examine how returnee programming aligns with existing strategic internationalization goals in place on their campus. Participants will walk away enthused and ready to work with this passionate group of students, armed with strategies to appeal to them and to enhance the opportunities their office offers for these students. What are you most excited about in delivering this workshop at the 2016 NAFSA Annual Conference? Kindred: Reentry for education abroad students has been a hot topic for a long time. Institutions and organizations have worked to develop programming to meet the needs of these students and we are excited to share these practices with institutions who are just beginning this conversation or who have programming in place that they wish to strengthen. We are excited to offer the inaugural workshop on this conversation and the opportunity to highlight what great work our colleagues in the field are doing in terms of reentry. We are eager to see what new ideas and programming will happen as a result of this workshop and the connections our participants will make both with the material and the institutions that created this programming. Of course, we are also excited to be in a room with other passionate EA colleagues fueled by candy and creativity to explore these best practices for enhancing opportunities for students. We love this topic and can’t wait to share the good work our field is doing in terms of education abroad alumni programming. If you had to give a one sentence pitch for your CTW, what would it be? Kindred: Students who return from an international experience are the future of our field (and our nation) and the CTW Current Trends in Education Abroad Alumni Programming will provide concrete strategies and replicable curricular and co-curricular models for innovative engagement of this critical population. Learn more about the 2016 NAFSA Annual Conference Preconference Workshops at www.nafsa.org/ac16workshops . Kara Johnson is assistant director of the International Center at the Illinois Institute of Technology and the 2016 Annual Conference Committee Workshop Coordinator.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

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50 Shades of Pink – Azalea Bloom at the Arboretum in Washington DC Photo Essay Even though this is my fourth time to Washington DC, I had never heard of the Arboretum in Washington DC. But when I saw our bartender’s eyes sparkle with so much passion, when he told us about this place, I […] The post 50 Shades of Pink – Azalea Bloom at the Arboretum in Washington DC appeared first on Maria Abroad .

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By Mitch Gordon and Steve Moraco The rise of high-tech startups and other transformative entities have dramatically changed how we do business and live our daily lives over the past decade. Uber changed the way we think about mobility. Airbnb changed the way we travel. Netflix changed how we watch TV. We’ve all seen firsthand how these important startups have fostered innovation and forward thinking. Leading-edge innovation is affecting the world of international education as well. Take for example the emerging world of online education. Coursera, 2U, General Assembly, and others will impact the world of international education in ways that can’t be clearly seen at the moment. So when we attend an event like the NAFSA Annual Conference & Expo, one of the largest international education events in the world featuring the most-established players in the field, we often wonder, “What are we doing to support the small teams, the startups, and the less-established organizations?” The ones who have the bold, the silly, and the (sometimes) naive ideas. How do they find their place at NAFSA 2016 and the field in general? Their ideas have value. Remember, every one of those “game changing” new products or services started out as an unfounded idea about how the world could be made better. If you wonder the same thing, then you should join us on Thursday, June 2, in the Career Center at the NAFSA 2016 Annual Conference & Expo in Denver. This session is intended for anybody in international education who is interested in innovation, whether they are a young professional starting out, an entrepreneur, a founder, an intrapraneur, or an established leader. All are invited take part as we explore how to make innovation a core component of career success and how organizations can be more forward thinking. It’s important to note that every organization (and university, for that matter) was once a small organization supported by a few passionate employees who believed in their long-term mission, and supporting aspiring innovative organizations in the field of international education is no different. In fact, we would argue that it is essential to our mission of creating new international education opportunities for students throughout the world. Toward that end, we are organizing The Innovation & Entrepreneurship MIG , which will endeavor to serve, support, and connect enthusiastic innovators, leaders, and thinkers of all ages and experience levels. To support this, please click here to sign our petition. Interested in learning more? Join Mitch and his colleague Mallory Meiser on Thursday, June 2, from 3:00 p.m.-3:45 p.m., for their presentation, “ Creating an Entrepreneurial Career in International Education: Innovating from the Inside ,” in the Career Center located in the Four Seasons Ballroom 4.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

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15 Ways To Earn Money AND Travel 1. Keep your old job and convince your boss to let you work remotely Ok, this one obviously does not work for everyone. But if your job only requires you and a computer, you can probably do it from home and therefore, anywhere in the world. “But how […] The post 15 Ways To Earn Money AND Travel appeared first on Maria Abroad .

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By Kara Johnson Last week, I kicked off the 2016 Annual Conference Committee’s inaugural Workshop Preview series by featuring my conversation with Jin Abe , lead trainer for the Current Topics Workshop (CTW) Experiential Learning to Facilitate Intercultural Understanding . The Workshop Preview series is designed to highlight some of the can’t-miss professional learning opportunities at this year’s NAFSA Annual Conference & Expo in Denver. This week we feature an engaging conversation with Daphne Orr, international student adviser at Georgia State University, who gave me the inside scoop about her upcoming CTW Building Your International Student and Scholar Services (ISSS) Crisis Management Plan and how it will benefit participants and their institutions. Why is this CTW critical to international educators at this time? Orr: In this day and age, sadly, we are faced with crisis on a seemingly continual basis, from campus violence or catastrophes, to a rise in awareness of mental health issues, as well as issues abroad such as natural disasters and political unrest. As professionals in ISSS or intensive English program (IEP) administration, we need to be as best prepared as possible so that when a crisis occurs we can tap into the planning and resources that we already have in place and best serve our international students and scholars, as well as our campus communities. We all know that the ISSS office, be it at a large university, a one-person office, an intensive English program or otherwise, is a very busy environment, and when a crisis occurs we must focus much of our attention to the issue and devote many of our resources to assist. Having a good, solid crisis management plan in place BEFORE a crisis occurs can position those in the ISSS office in a way to have the most positive and effective outcome. What will a participant in your CTW walk away with that will enhance the work they do in their jobs? Orr: This is a very valuable workshop for all professionals serving international students and scholars. Participants will have the ability to network with other professionals as they actually develop sections of crisis management plans for their institution. By networking and collaborating with others, they learn best practices for approaching crisis at similar institutions in similar contexts, from large public institutions to small private institutions and just about everything in between! The workshop also provides a great deal of resources on the topic of crisis management and different modules that one can use to build a crisis management plan that best suits their institution. Who is on your training team and how does the experience of each trainer support the learning objectives of your workshop? Orr: We have a fantastic training team for this workshop, and it is such an honor to work with them as they have so much experience and insight to share. Maria Anastasiou is the executive director of the Office of International Education and Development (OIED) at Appalachian State University. She works closely with the associate vice chancellor to implement Appalachian State’s strategic plan and internationalization strategic plan and manages the day-to-day operations of OIED. She has been a member of NAFSA’s Subcommittee on Crisis Management since 2012 and has served as chair of the subcommittee since 2014. Tamara Felden is director of the Office of International Affairs and an associate dean of students at the University of Chicago. She joined the university in 2003, and her office serves an international population of more than 5,000 students and scholars and their families. Over the years, this work has included a role in various emergencies, ranging from individual situations, such as a student injured in a car accident, to large-scale emergencies, such as the one caused by the earthquake and tsunami in Japan. She has served as a member of NAFSA’s Subcommittee on Crisis Management since 2014. What are you most excited about in delivering this workshop at the 2016 NAFSA Annual Conference? Orr: I love getting to meet with all those that are participating! Each time that I have done the workshop I have learned so much from the others and their experiences, and I feel so fortunate to bring this collective experience back to my office and institution so that we can continue to strengthen our own crisis management plans. We really build a great community and one that we can continue to draw on when we have a crisis situation in the future. If you had to give a one sentence pitch for your CTW, what would it be? Orr: Utilizing NAFSA crisis management resources and a cohort of other ISSS and IEP professionals engaged in crisis management planning at their own institutions, we will walk away with not only tools and best practices for responding to crises that involve international students and scholars, but we will actually have drafted our crisis management plans to take back to our institutions with us! Learn more about the 2016 NAFSA Annual Conference Preconference Workshops at www.nafsa.org/ac16workshops . Kara Johnson is assistant director of the International Center at the Illinois Institute of Technology and the 2016 Annual Conference Committee Workshop Coordinator.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

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German-US Dual Citizenship: Process and FAQs Getting your German-US Dual Citizenship is quite a confusing and time consuming process. Since I just recently went through this process of becoming a German/US Dual Citizen, I wanted to share my personal experience, resources I found helpful and answer some of the most important questions that I have received […] The post German-US Dual Citizenship: Process and FAQs appeared first on Maria Abroad .

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Public Art in Denver

by Paul Joseph on April 19, 2016 · 0 comments

By Michele Friedmann Public art says a lot about the identity of a city. One of the first pieces of art to greet people flying into Denver is Blue Mustang , a 32-foot tall, fiberglass statue of a blue horse. The story of Blue Mustang is a tumultuous one – the artist Luis Jimenez was crushed by the horse during its construction and never saw his masterpiece completed. The red-eyed statue, known as “Blucifer” to locals, continued to cause controversy at Denver International Airport (DIA). Some petitioned for the statue’s removal, arguing that the statue creates bad vibes. However, others feel the statue is an iconic symbol of Colorado. When you arrive at the convention center, your eyes will automatically be drawn to the 40-foot blue bear peaking inside the windows as he towers next to the building. Artist Lawrence Argent wanted to create a piece that would enhance the uniqueness of the form and space of the building and also showcased the natural surroundings of Colorado. With his artwork for the building, Argent wanted to focus on what it was like to be a Denver resident. While brainstorming for the project in 2005, bears were venturing into Denver, due to a drought in the surrounding the area. Argent saw a photo in a local newspaper of a black bear looking into someone’s window and the image stayed with him. He wanted the bear to have a similar texture to the toys his sons played with – this inspired the sculpture’s toy look. The blue bear, officially titled I See What You Mean is now not only the iconic symbol of the Colorado Convention Center but also the city itself. Another eccentric sculpture that’s hard to miss can be found in the Denver Theatre District in Sculpture Park. This well-known piece is called The Dancers and stands 60 feet high! It is a 25-ton steel and fiberglass sculpture. Mounted around the circular base of the sculpture are 5 speakers that continuously play the song “Let’s Dance” by Jonathan Borofsky and Samuel Conlogue. Borofsky seeks to highlight in his work that “everything is connected and all is one.” Information on the I-Engage Talks is now up on NAFSA’s website – I highly encourage you to check them out. They are shaping up to be the best yet! Michele Friedmann is the Local Arrangements Team (LAT) communications chair for the NAFSA 2016 Annual Conference & Expo. Michele was born and raised in Reading, Pennsylvania. She attended Gettysburg College where her love for study abroad began. Michele spent a semester in Australia, circumnavigated the globe on Semester at Sea, and student taught in London. Michele earned a master’s degree from the School for International Training in the area of international education. She interned for Barcelona SAE as a program and student adviser. She has worked for the Institute of International Education and the Fulbright Foreign Student Program. Michele is currently the student and program manager for Global Players, a study abroad program geared toward student athletes.

[via NAFSA: Association of International Educators Blog]

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